Andaseat Na’Vi Edition gaming chair review

Fans of the Natus Vincere esports team will be very excited to hear of Andaseat’s new Na’Vi Edition gaming chair. In fact, anyone who finds joy in the wild world of bright coloured upholstery, yet is still grounded enough to heed the importance of ergonomics, will appreciate this canary yellow racing style gaming chair. And although it’s essentially just a Na’Vi themed aesthetic for the Dark Demon gaming chair we reviewed last year, for a little bit more money, it brings a welcome blast of sunshine to the intense, nail-biting world of esports fandom.

Andaseat Na’Vi specs

Max rec. height: 200cm
Max weight, static: 170kg
Recline: 160°
Material: PVC Leather
Armrests: 4D
Colours: Yellow, Black yellow trim
Launch price: $450 (£370) 

Of course, the most notable thing about this chair is its colour. There are very few high-end gaming chairs in full-on banana glow PVC leather, but somehow Andaseat has pulled it off. For anyone who streams, vlogs, or otherwise shows off their seating arrangement, it’s certainly a talking point. Plus, seeing this golden throne every morning for the past week has given me a nice little mood lift.

If you’re not into the whole dazzling lemon aesthetic, there’s a slightly more reserved version available in black, with a few small, yellow adornments. It’s not got the same head-turning ability as its sister chair, but it’s certainly got more flair than the original, sleek black Dark Demon gaming chair.

Unlike the Dark Demon, with its 139cm maximum height, the Na’Vi Edition is available only in large, at 200cm max height. That’s great for taller esports fans with a wider build, and it even supports up to 170kg of weight, but for smol people like me, it can be a little awkward. 

The back support is great no matter your height, and although I feel like taller would be better, the included lumbar support and neck pillow do let you adjust the chair to suit you. The pillows themselves are comfy as well, but a little awkward to attach and adjust. At this price, I was expecting built-in lumbar support, honestly.

The issue with the chair’s size mainly manifests in the armrest distance. Despite them being 4D adjustable, and bolted to the underside as close to centre as possible, I can’t comfortably type without having one arm hanging beside the armrest. The result is this asymmetric posture that I’m sure isn’t doing me any favours.

Talking of the armrests, they’re also a bit dubious. If you use them to push yourself up, they’ll pivot from the pressure, without you needing to press a button first—it’s a pet peeve that the rest of the hardware team can attest to after watching me flail around at work over it, and it can be pretty dangerous. Otherwise, they’re stable enough and, although they do not come with any cushioning, they’ve got great adjustability to suit your needs.

The Andaseat Na'Vi Edition gaming chair in bright yellow

(Image credit: Future)

Sitting comfortably?

(Image credit: Secretlab)

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Sadly, if your needs involve keeping the cost of your setup down, this may not be the chair for you. At $450, it’s only $50 less than the Secretlab Titan Evo, currently at the top of our best gaming chair list, and when you can get something premium like the Secretlab Omega for $100 less nowadays, the Na’Vi starts to sound less like a good investment—particularly for those whose shoulders are not broad as some.

At the same time, it is a rare thing to find a decent gaming chair that attends to those with acquired tastes in upholstery colour. And while there are plenty of premium gaming chairs that let you show off your favourite superhero, or game series, this is the only one that lets you bask in the full Na’Vi aesthetic, complete with player stats and crosshair. For the ‘Obsessed We,’ this is the chair to own, just don’t expect it to come cheap.

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